What Does An Architect Do? Interesting Fact From Redditers

Hello Folks,…. What does an architect do ??? is always as curious and suspicious subject for all those out of the field, and they are always this like aliens and react to designers and architect like – what does an architect do?

Here are some interesting collection what i found on my Reddit niche, on and about what does an architect do? And i think this must share with my fellow readers and wingers that people are thinking about architects and architecture.

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What Does An Architect Do ? …… 😉

Here is a collection of what different Reditters share their views on what does an architect do and what does an architect make in their life. Let’s not wast more space and get back to on track of what does an architect do.

1.

I find that clients do not fully understand what happens “behind the scenes”. This makes it tough to justify a fee, resulting in an overall loss of finances in the profession as a whole.

My question is really directed to the unfamiliar – what is it that you believe an architect actually does? I’m looking for an outsiders prospective to better understand how someone may envision myself or the profession. (contractors included)

For the design professionals; We know there’s a TON of work that can or can not go into a project. How do you decide where to draw the line so to speak? Is it code minimum? Are you able to upkeep your own higher standards? We know and the government knows design professionals are required, but occupants, contractors and the like are always trying to cut corners thinking our services are not required or costly. How do we start changing this terrible notion?

2.

I’m an “outsider” who thinks architects design buildings. Commercial, residential or otherwise. The needs vary. All the stuff you do “behind the scenes” doesn’t have to be. Tell the client what you’re doing. It’s not justifying a fee, it’s explaining to them what they’re paying for.

Don’t try to make it seem like it’s over their head or they couldn’t possibly understand. Treat them with respect and communicate with them at a level that you can both benefit from. There is a lot of work that goes in to something that is designed well. “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

3.

Client: Draw this line, and nothing but this line

Architect: The line would be better like this (and legal), I’ll draw both and you can pick

C: I like my line better, throw that other line away

A: But your line is illegal, maybe if we did it like this?

C: Just do what I tell you to, that’s what I’m paying you for!

Building and Safety: What is this line? You can’t do this.

A: The city doesn’t like this line

C: Just make it work! threatens lawsuit

4.

A major problem i see is no one is paying for this part of the service. They think the contractor has it all covered and when you compete for an architectural fee you can tell your client well, we can come lower but no construction administration.

Then they work with contractors who put in the lowest prices; guess what they are not including time and money for this coordination either (even if its in the drawings, ahem.). The architect ends up having to do it because no one wants to get sued, and you don’t want your project to turn out like shit.

Can’t stress how important CA is, love working with a good project manager on the construction side.

Brings me to another issue – anyone see the low and high bid get thrown out like it should? I keep seeing lowest bidder win and its always the worst! These are the guys who left something out or are just low balling for work and providing poor craftsmanship.

5.

Yes, I never said they didn’t.

That would be ridiculous.

However nothing listed there is unique to architects, and in larger firms you have dept devoted to handling the bulk of that work. My projects are industrial, so building projects that aren’t design-build, and that involve an architect or firm generally have others competing these tasks.

What I’m saying is, you don’t need to be an architect to do any of the above. Obviously if you are interpreting design and then transmitting wish to issue a dcn or fcn or ifc or whatever, you need a stamp, but that’s besides the point.

You can do all of these fun and exciting things without being an architect 🙂

6.

Well I was a tad off topic like what does an architect do?

For example once you’re at the construction, or per-construction phase, and you have a prime who is submitting COR’s for multiple subs, and you’re running up millions of dollars worth of changes you probably want a financial controller to review, and evaluate those changes before they get to whoever (arch, eng, etc) to signing for them.

Even for smaller projects, it makes sense (to me) to have someone go through the paperwork, make sure backup is attached, make sure everything adds up properly, makes sure they’re complying with the contract etc. etc. before approving a draft COR…

7.

I’m not really an outsider because I study architecture, but I’d say that the problem, so to speak, is that architects are artists, and are treated with the same level of respect that most people give to artists – which is to say an architect’s usefulness and talent isn’t appreciated enough.

Most people don’t understand how difficult good art is, and generally aren’t capable of recognizing good art if it isn’t sensational and famous. Therefore, non-famous but otherwise capable architects sometimes aren’t respected by the client.

For example, the average client knows what good architecture is according to the examples he knows, and most likely only appreciates those examples aesthetically (which to an extent is justified, because architecture can sometimes be hard to read/understand if you’re not “in the loop”, so to speak).

As an unfortunate result, if this client’s architect tries to propose something good and reasonable but unfamiliar or perhaps too normal (for budget reasons), then he is written off. Similarly, if the architect proposes something good and flashy and is not a big name, such a building will almost always be too expensive, because the client does not understand that “impressive” and “cheap” are almost entirely mutually exclusive.

The point is: Most people do not understand what does an architect do or good art costs money, and I don’t know how to fix that.

8.

Yeah, I can tell you’re a student because 80-90% of architecture is absolutely not art. It’s project management, it’s budget management, it’s paper management, it’s consultant management, it’s design management, it’s math, it’s code research, it’s site research, it’s client management, it’s salesmanship, it’s drafting, it’s redlines, it’s checking boxes, it’s filling out forms.

A very select few architects can be mostly artists, but under almost every starachitect designed building, you’ll see another architect called the project architect that does all the dirty work.

I suppose what I’m trying to say is, don’t expect to be an artist, because you absolutely will be disappointed.

9.

I see where your trying to go with this and its a valid point. I think this is a stronger issue with a so called “starchitect”. At the end of the day everyone worried about money and i mean initial construction cost.

I think if a client fully understands certain projects as investments that will make them more money we would be better off. Everyone is typically focused so short term that this is really a hard sell.

Another problem you pointed out is clients taking too much control. Its a tough situation because its their money and their home-business-corporation. Then what does an architect do?

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Aahhhh,…..See, How many different kind of overviews and experiences on the just simple but most important question it that “What does an architect do?”. Hope you really enjoy the article and if you have to say some thing about what does an architect do? or other conversations, feel free to put your thoughts in comments.